You Gotta Ask Yourself One Question

Have you ever been enjoying a conversation, and someone brings up a hot new show that you did not know existed? Of course, everyone else knows about it. Characters and terms you have not even heard of start flying around the room, and you have no hope of catching them. All you can do is duck and get of out of the way of the hype plane.

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P.J. Wehry
Older Entrepreneurs Do It Better

Last weekend's Wall Street Journal featured a fascinating article, by Carl Schramm, that certain bucks the prevailing thought about innovation and creativity. While this article does not discuss all the implications, the observations of this article certainly raises interesting questions when you think about corporate America being incubators for innovation. Carl Schramm is a professor at Syracuse University.  

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Crosland Stuart
The Power of Expression: A Goofy Looking Dog

 In the book Anansi Boys, Anansi, the African god of storytelling, is sitting on his front porch in Florida (he’s retired) when he notices a prize-winning dog strutting back and forth on the lawn across the street. It’s a boxer with all the proud defining characteristics of its breed.

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P.J. Wehry
We Should All Be Bus Drivers

I decided this morning that the bus drivers are my favorite working citizens in the District. They good-naturedly wait for me when I, all but, sprint across the crosswalk to board the bus on time. They don't seem to hold it against me that I forget to buzz my card when I finally do make it on.

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Anna Bret Allen
Should Our Goal Be to Create Jobs at All Costs?

Dr. Anne Bradley, Vice President of Economic Initiatives at the Institute for Faith, Work & Economics, helps us to better understand economics 101 when it comes to the relationship between creating wealth and creating jobs. Job creation is a hot political talking point and constantly in the news.

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Crosland Stuart
Economic Liberty Benefits the Least the Most

Doug Bandow is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, where he specializes in foreign policy and civil liberties.  In the article below, he promotes economic liberty (a.k.a. capitalism) as a means by which the least of these can benefit. On the cusp of Congress passing a major tax overhaul, regardless of your politics, there is a lot of discussion about economics.We live in a world of exploding opportunities and growing challenges. New technologies are transforming our lives. Despite intermittent economic and financial crises, residents of the West live better than any other people at any other point in human history. Many people in the East, and increasingly in Latin America and Africa as well, are joining them.

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Crosland Stuart
Why is a $15 toy selling for $5,000?

This article below by Jim Denison is interesting because not only does it reveal the subtleties by which greed can become an acceptable standard, but it also shows that recognizing this vice for what it is can be difficult especially when it is cloaked in technological advances. Greed is powerful and a destroyer of virtue. Denison offers some helpful suggestions on how we can improve our spiritual fitness in this area.

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Crosland Stuart
Creativity Is Your Call. Restoration Is Your Purpose.

So often creativity is relegated to something pertaining to the arts. However, creativity is one of God's gifts he has freely given to all. It is a gift that is often misunderstood and under utilized. In the article below Art Lindsley helps to move us closer to embracing this blessing while challenging us to use it.

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Crosland Stuart
EDITORIAL: WE BELIEVE IN INSTITUTIONS

James K.A. Smith has an amazing way of tapping into our inherent design, calling it to the forefront of our conversation, and helping us to understand how we are further cultivating the virtue of it or working to destroy it. In the article below he discusses the importance of institutions and how our actions are either about bolstering them or tearing them a part. His insight in so many areas is one of the blessings God has given to the Evangelical world.

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Crosland Stuart
Work Songs

"Remember,” he said, with a twinkle in his eye: “we’re trying to reach hearts and minds—not minds and hearts.”

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Josh Good
Little Man, Big Idea

In our increasingly secularized culture, you and I feel the pressure to isolate our faith, to keep it on the backburner. Out of sight. The broader culture doesn’t much care what we believe in the privacy of our own hearts, but we dare not bring our faith out in public. 

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Robert Wolgemuth
Who Do I Want To Be?

As a little boy, a lot of time was spent thinking about that question every child gets asked: What am I going to be when I grow up?  Many of you are still trying to figure it out.  For me, the answer was obvious:  from age 5, I was going to be a professional basketball player,

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David Swanson
Why 500 Years Matters

On October 31, 1517 Martin Luther mustered an incalculable amount of courage as he nailed a copy of his 95 Theses to the door of the Wittenberg Castle Church. As difficult as it is to imagine the amount of spiritual fortitude needed to take this kind of action, so too is it hard to measure the impact that the Reformation has had on all of Christendom since.

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Crosland Stuart
The Reformation, Evangelicals, & the Trumpian Age

Protestant Christianity celebrates 500 years of ministry on October 31. On this day in 1517 the German friar Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to Wittenberg’s cathedral door. Luther’s theses exposed theological fault lines placing him and his fellow reformers at odds with the Roman Catholic Church. Today Protestant evangelicals, likewise, are discovering new theological fault lines among themselves. Ironically, these differences emerge from the same reforms Luther initiated.

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Case Thorp
Guided By Faith, Not Culture

Meet Patti Rader who is embarking on her own leap of faith.  Several years ago, after much prayer and consideration, she believed that God was calling her out of ministry and to join her husband in the business world. In many Christian circles this kind of move would be criticized and while maybe not said out loud this decision would illicit much judgement. Of course then, there are others who would not understand.

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Crosland Stuart
If God’s a Worker, What Kind of Work Does He Do?

 Let's be honest, some days it is hard to understand what our jobs or daily activities have to do with God's redemptive work or plan or purpose. There is a small percentage of folks who have jobs that neatly fit the categories we can easily conjure up like ministry related work, pastors, missionaries, etc. However, for the rest of us at times it can be a struggle. Russell Gehrlein in his blog for the Institute of Faith, Work, & Economics, helps us to better understand the significance of our work. What a difference it would make to recall on our tough days our purpose and place in God's plan. The article below should better prepare us for our next hard day. 

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Crosland Stuart
Flourishing Is for Every Dimension of Life, Not Just Work

One of the pitfalls of overused words is that the meaning can be cheapened and when this happens with significant terms we all lose. In the article that follows, Dr. Art Lindsley, Vice President of Theological Initiatives at the Institute for Faith, Work & Economics and an esteemed author and teacher, defines flourishing and in doing so underscores once again the importance it has for Christians. Lindsley gives us a glimpse of the all encompassing and inspiring nature of this word making it a term worthy of a place in our vocabulary.

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Crosland Stuart
Great Is Thy Faithfulness...

In the midst of the hum of generators, the buzzing of chainsaws, and the miserable humidity, Floridians are beginning the painstaking process of putting their lives back together after Hurricane Irma. These can be challenging days especially if you are one of the 65% of Floridians who do not have power.

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Crosland Stuart
PERSUASION IS FOR AMATEURS

Gracy Olmstead, associate managing editor at The Federalist and the Thursday editor of BRIGHT, a weekly newsletter for women, challenges us to think more about people rather than labels. The article's byline of "Why a focus on adjectives, rather than nouns, might be the salve our political culture needs" gives insight into a better way to love thy neighbor regardless of political affiliation. Read all the way to the end to appreciate the pizza graphic. Happy reading or should I say happy eating.

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Crosland Stuart